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What do you do when they kick you out of your own parish?

There is no getting around the fact that the Pope intended Traditionis Custodes to bring about the immediate suppression of the Traditional Latin Mass (TLM), and it doesn’t take much guesswork to conclude that his long term goal is the complete elimination of the TLM from the face of the earth. This pontificate has made masterful use of evasive and vague wording on almost every controversial statement or decision, so much so that the new phrase “weaponized ambiguity” has come into common use.

There is nothing, however, about Traditionis Custodes which is the least bit ambiguous. He wants us gone, and the sooner the better.

In diocese after diocese across the world, faithful (and yes, loyal) Catholics are being told to get the hell out and to take their accursed Latin Mass with them. Pastors of diocesan parishes which offer a TLM in addition to their standard Novus Ordo fare have been put on notice: “Kick ’em out. Now! And if we ever catch you sneaking around to say a pre-Vatican II mass, we’ll kick you out as well.”

Thankfully, not every bishop has rolled over. Although many are complying with the diktat from Rome, there are bishops who are showing some form of resistance to this vindictive set of orders. Some are invoking Canon 87 and refusing to change a thing, while others–perhaps because they’re 100% on board with the Papal Pogrom or because they’re simply scared–are executing the plan as ordered. Masses are being suppressed, Traditional Catholics are being told to hit the road.

There are some bishops who fall somewhere in the middle of the spectrum. Although they’re intent on carrying out Papal orders, they do have a sense of obligation to their flocks who have become the objects of the Vatican’s ire. These are the bishops who are attempting to ease the “transition” in some fashion. Oh, they are forcing the TLM out of the parishes, sure enough, but they’re doing so in a way to assist with some sort of “soft landing” for the hapless Traddies who will now be searching for some alternate venue where they can still attend the Mass of the Ages.

In my particular situation, I am a member of the local FSSP parish which has (as of late August 2021, anyway), not yet been actively targeted for elimination. I also help out at a Novus Ordo parish which has been offering the TLM for many years. Traditionis Custodes has clobbered that parish pretty hard, as you might imagine. The good news is that our local Ordinary has been helpful in facilitating our search for a new home. For that we are truly grateful, while at the same time being more than a little disappointed that he didn’t invoke Canon 87.

Trying to set up a new venue for a renegade TLM in short order is not an easy thing. There are challenges aplenty, as this video describes…

Here’s your handy guide for setting up your very own TLM “Community.” Finding a 21st Century Catacomb in six easy steps! (or not…)

Of Toxic Traddies and Sinking Ships…

The repercussions of  Traditionis Custodes continue to resonate throughout the Catholic world.

Thankfully, not all of the bishops have responded with swift draconian enthusiasm to this new diktat. Many prelates are taking a cautious wait & see approach, while others have openly assured worried Catholics in their dioceses that nothing will change. One bishop in particular has gone so far as telling his priests in effect “if you want to start saying the TLM, drop me an email and I’ll run it up the chain of command.” More shepherds like him, please!

Here at this tiny internet backwater called Catholic Cyber-Militia, activity has picked up. One video published on my YouTube channel has exploded (and by “exploded” I mean that it’s received over 1500 views in the last 48 hours. Most Catholic YouTubers can get that many views in the first five minutes after posting, but for our rinky-dink outfit, 1.5k views in a year would be above-average!). In the finest click bait tradition, the video was titled “Why I No Longer Attend My Latin Mass Parish Weekly.” Instead of revealing something profound and shocking, the punch line is that so many new people are attending our FSSP parish each week that I decided to give up my seat for others, opting instead to attend a wonderful TLM offered by a diocesan parish church. And, being a former Navy man, I had to obtusely couch the whole thing in terms of a famous incident in WW2 where a chaplain on a sinking cruiser gave his lifejacket to a sailor, telling him “Take it lad. You need it more than I do.” There’s a link to said video below.

Given the events of the last week, I suppose the search engines were working overtime to scrape up anything relating to the Traditional Latin Mass, so this video from Jan 2020 must have bubbled to the top of some peoples’ searches. We’ve been getting an uptick of views along with some very interesting comments.

One of the comments was a thoughtful post written by a viewer who pointed out some very real problem areas when it comes not to the TLM per se, but rather those who attend it. Among his comments, “The TLM appears to be on a theological, liturgical and, all too often, political war footing. They not only prefer not to participate in the NO, but condemn it, sometimes in the harshest terms.”

He has a point, and it’s a point worth considering. The YouTube comments section isn’t the best place to compose a lengthy essay, but because I’m inherently lazy, I decided to cut & paste my reply and include it here:

We’ve all experienced the “Toxic Traddie,” whether on line or in person.  Being overly-pugilistic is not helpful to our cause.  I’m no psychobabbler, but I think that some of the over-aggressiveness comes from having had to assume a defensive posture for so many decades.  They were actively trying to suppress the TLM in the ’70’s and early 80’s, and the efforts of local bishops to force everyone adhering to the Mass of the Ages underground were, in retrospect, perceived as the first wave of prosecution.  We’ve been treated as 2nd class citizens for so very long.

Much of our criticisms of the new Mass is the seemingly never-ending stream of “innovations” that we see getting applied at the parish & diocesan levels. It seems more like experimentation than innovation, and in the first few years of Novus Ordo mass attendance following my conversion from Evangelical Protestantism, it seemed as if most of the experiments were failing.  In no particular order, the felt banners, cheezy hootenanny music, liturgical dancing, balloons, slide shows, the increasingly Protestant-looking interior architecture…all of this led me to wonder why we were trying so hard–and failing–to be like a polyglot mixture of a dozen non-Catholic churches. 

Those criticisms can be viewed as simply a matter of preference, and I get that.  What seems stunningly sublime to Joe can seem in hideously bad taste to Jill.  But when I considered how our Lord was treated in the many NO masses I attended, that got me concerned.  The casual approach to meeting God Himself in the Eucharist was widespread.  Being told not to kneel, having kneelers removed to enforce the no-kneeling policy, the hit-or-miss approach to confession, the insistence that the priest was no different than us; he just happened to be up on the podium.  All of the lay people traipsing up and down to perform this or that little function were just essential as Father’s activities.  I got the sense that the priest as “Alter Christus” was being deliberately abandoned.  If the “presider” is nothing more than a layman who happens to know more about theology than I do, then why did I quit being a Baptist?  Brother Quincy at my old Baptist church could run rings around the typical NO homily, the music was far more uplifting and theologically cogent, and the congregation wasn’t simply “phoning in;” they were hanging on every word being preached from the pulpit.

As I discovered more about the twenty centuries of Catholic theology and tradition to which I was now heir, the cognitive dissonance between what I was reading and what I was seeing every Sunday was more than troubling. 

I became a CCD teacher and was told that I was emphasizing the “old stuff” too much.  I joined the Parish Council in an attempt to influence the liturgical experimentation in our particular church, hoping to nudge it back a little towards a traditional stance.  I was verbally encouraged by the deacon to look for another parish.

Then I discovered the Latin Mass.  To those familiar with that Mass, no explanation regarding the incredible contrasts is required.  To those who have no idea how it is different or why so many of us see it as the future of the Church, well I ask you to go and see for yourself!

Although Rome has not yet made the Traditional Latin Mass outright illegal (at least, not as of late July 2021), they have taken dramatic steps to check its spread and begin rolling it back into a shrinking number of “Trad ghettoes.”  Go and see for yourself.  See how mean and toxic the Traddies are.  See how the clueless they appear because everything’s being said in some dead language.  See how divisive they are because the theology they adhere to can–at times–seem almost unrecognizable when compared to what you might experience in your home NO parish. 

Do I think the Novus Ordo Mass is invalid?  No, I do not.  Do I believe that Christ is truly present on the altar at the moment of consecration?  Yes, I do.  Do I think that Christ’s Real Presence is maintained in the tabernacle?  Absolutely!  It’s just that in many NO churches, the tabernacle has been removed from its due place of honor behind the high altar.  (“Jesus? Sure!  Down the hall to the left, right past the rest rooms.”)

Christ is truly present in the Novus Ordo, but His Presence is often obscured to some degree by many of the trappings, procedures, and rubrics which emphasize horizontality (people-centered) rather than verticality (lifting our eyes toward Heaven). 

Are there pockets in Traddiedom which believe that Vatican II was so completely off the rails that the NO is invalid?  Yes.  We have a spectrum of people in just the same way that Noviedom does.  I must remind myself not to judge what I know to be a faithful, orthodox Novus Ordo parish, painting it with the same brush as the crazy Novus Ordo parish down the street, resplendent with balloons, giant puppets, a praise band jazz combo, liturgical dancing girls and heterodox preaching.  I’ve experienced all those things first-hand (well, not those giant puppets), and even as I was cringing in my pew I should have reminded myself that this wasn’t the entire post-V2 Church.  I tried to remind myself of that, but perhaps too often I failed to take my own advice.

For anyone out there who has been flame-sprayed by a Toxic Traddie on line, I apologize…particularly if I was the guy holding the flame thrower.  In the spirit of Christian Brotherhood, I would ask my mainstream Novus Ordo friends to reconsider the small but growing community of Traditional Catholics and ask yourselves two questions: 

What is it that you actually know about us?

 Does it seem fair or just that we are being targeted for extinction by our own hierarchy?

The video that tied sinking ships and the TLM together in a rather round-about fashion…

Now, back to the tangential issue of “click bait.” This article’s very title is a tad bit guilty of this. Are “toxic traddies” making things worse or better? It’s a problem, and I urge my fellow Trads to dial down the rhetoric a bit. Let’s continue to make our case forcefully, but with more charity.

Is there a “sinking ship” in all this? Yes, I think there’s a ship that is taking on water and needs to right itself before capsizing, but it might not be the ship you think…

See below for more on the hotbutton “Toxic Traddie” issue..

A Lament…

As we continue to absorb this kick in the gut called Traditionis Custodes, let us resolve to remain faithful to those Traditions handed down to us over the centuries by the Apostles, who received them from Christ Himself.

At this particular moment, however, you might be feeling a little low about this latest diktat from Rome. That’s understandable. I offer you this, a short lament set to the song “Babylon” by Don. McClean…

#MassOfTheAges

Now is NOT the Time for Nastiness

Thunderstorm with lightning striking in and around Vatican.

If you are of a traditional mindset, you are likely to find yourself dismayed and angered by this latest news from Rome. Our Holy Father’s latest motu proprio, Traditionis Custodes, which has placed new restrictions on the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, is most certainly a source of consternation and dismay, and, yes…anger.

It should certainly not be a surprise, however. We knew it was coming. All of the sniper fire coming from the Holy See regarding “rigid” Traditional Catholics pretty much telegraphed their hostility towards us.

Nobody is quite sure to react. I’m writing this Friday evening, 16 July, and we’re still waiting for all the dust and debris to settle. The FSSP is taking a cautious wait & see approach in their Statement Regarding Traditionis Custodes.

Caution on our part is called for as well.

Now is not the time for nastiness. If we take to social media ranting and railing against the injustice of it all, and begin trading insult-for-insult with others Catholic netizens who think this latest news is just marvelous, well we simply play into the hands of the Modernists, don’t we? “See? SEE? We told you those toxic Traddies were a hateful bunch. Just look atall the venom they’re spewing on social media!”

We have many Catholic brethren who are fence-sitters when it comes to this controversy. They haven’t been paying attention. They’re content and comfortable with their Novus Ordo parish; they might be aware that some of their friends “prefer” the Latin Mass (in much the same way that somebody might “prefer” a Whopper to a Big Mac), but they really don’t have a clue as to what’s at stake. They will have progressive/Modernist friends (maybe even their pastor) who will tell them that Trads are a schismatic cult. They’re modern day Pharisees, only nastier. If we react with outrage, jabbing our fingers wildly this way and that as we point out the heretics among us, what kind of an impression do you think that will make on your non-Trad friends?

That doesn’t mean we have to sidestep the issue. Certainly not! What I would suggest to you, however, is that we take a calm and rational approach when we explain the situation to our friends. It won’t be easy to do in the 90 seconds you might have at the office water cooler, but if you stop and think it over, I bet that you can come up with a succinct and reasonable explanation regarding the situation at hand. They’re called “elevator speeches,” because you have them more or less preplanned and rehearsed in your mind, allowing you to make your points in the time it takes the elevator car to go from the lobby to the second floor.

Keep your cool. Keep your rationality. Keep your sense of humor. Keep your faith.

#MassOfTheAges

Why Do They Fear our Latin Mass?

If you are a Traditional Catholic, you probably know that the revolutionary clique controlling the temporal reins of Holy Church doesn’t care for it very much. Judging by the language used by the highest levels of the hierarchy, they don’t care much for you either, if you’re a Trad. Summorum Pontificum certainly seems to be in the crosshairs, and nobody quite knows what that will mean for Catholics who prefer to worship as Catholics before them did for century upon century.

The question remains: why do they fear the Traditional Mass (and us)?

And…why does Hank Igitur look so odd in this video???

Another video worth watching is this one. Why do they fear this?

#MassOfTheAges

Start The New Year with a Veni Creator Spiritus. You’ll Be Glad You Did!

As we look back on the wretched year that was 2020, let us steel ourselves for the year ahead. May the Lord God of Armies protect His people from the rampages of the prince of this world. And may the Holy Spirit enflame the faithful with His Truth, and alight our souls in our struggle to attain Heaven, and may He convict the lost of their desperate need to acknowledge Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ as their one and only True King.

One of the most widely used hymns in the Church, Veni, Creator Spiritus, is attributed to Rabanus Maurus (776-856). It is used at Vespers, Pentecost, Dedication of a Church, Confirmation, and Holy Orders and whenever the Holy Spirit is solemnly invoked. A partial indulgence is granted to the faithful who recite it. A plenary indulgence is granted if it is recited on January 1st or on the feast of Pentecost.
www.PrecisLatinae.org
VENI, Creator Spiritus,
mentes tuorum visita,
imple superna gratia
quae tu creasti pectora.
COME, Holy Spirit, Creator blest,
and in our souls take up Thy rest;
come with Thy grace and heavenly aid
to fill the hearts which Thou hast made.
Qui diceris Paraclitus,
altissimi donum Dei,
fons vivus, ignis, caritas,
et spiritalis unctio.
O comforter, to Thee we cry,
O heavenly gift of God Most High,
O fount of life and fire of love,
and sweet anointing from above.
Tu, septiformis munere,
digitus paternae dexterae,
Tu rite promissum Patris,
sermone ditans guttura.
Thou in Thy sevenfold gifts are known;
Thou, finger of God’s hand we own;
Thou, promise of the Father, Thou
Who dost the tongue with power imbue.
Accende lumen sensibus:
infunde amorem cordibus:
infirma nostri corporis
virtute firmans perpeti.
Kindle our sense from above,
and make our hearts o’erflow with love;
with patience firm and virtue high
the weakness of our flesh supply.
Hostem repellas longius,
pacemque dones protinus:
ductore sic te praevio
vitemus omne noxium.
Far from us drive the foe we dread,
and grant us Thy peace instead;
so shall we not, with Thee for guide,
turn from the path of life aside.
Per te sciamus da Patrem,
noscamus atque Filium;
Teque utriusque Spiritum
credamus omni tempore.
Oh, may Thy grace on us bestow
the Father and the Son to know;
and Thee, through endless times confessed,
of both the eternal Spirit blest.
Deo Patri sit gloria,
et Filio, qui a mortuis
surrexit, ac Paraclito,
in saeculorum saecula.
Amen.
Now to the Father and the Son,
Who rose from death, be glory given,
with Thou, O Holy Comforter,
henceforth by all in earth and heaven.
Amen.

Do Cry For Me, Argentina

Argentine Citizens Celebrate Baby Killing
Argentines flock to the street to give glory to Moloch, a perfect way to end 2020.

Given the news from Argentina today, I think we should ignore Evita Peron’s advice. We definitely need to cry for Argentina.

According to People Magazine (people.com):

On Wednesday, the South American nation reached the milestone in women’s reproductive rights after the Argentine Senate voted 38 to 29 in favor of the measure, making the country the fourth in Latin America to legalize abortion after Uruguay, Cuba and Guyana, according to multiple outlets.

At the time I’m posting this, I’m not sure what (if anything) our Argentine Pope has to say on the matter. I’m sure that many of his friends (Jeffrey Sachs, Bill Gates, Joe Biden, Xi Jinping, et. al.) are delighted. Massive crowds celebrating the ability to murder their children seems just the perfect icing on the cake of this wretched year 2020, doesn’t it?

Pray for an end to abortion.

End the year with a Te Deum

Editor’s Note: To all my friends and readers here at CatholicCyber-Militia.com (all dozen of you!), it is my prayer that AD 2020–as rough and disastrous as it was–was, in God’s often unknowable Providence, a source of spiritual growth and rich blessing for you and yours.  That being said, I expect there are few people (perhaps outside Beijing and Davos) who are sad to see it go.

2021 is likely to be fraught with more dangers, uncertainty, and persecutions.  The Children of Darkness, as Abp. Viganò has so aptly labeled them, will continual their triumphal march to destruction, hell-bent (literally) as many of the Children of Light with them as possible.  Our task remains the same:  to remain true to the King of Kings until His return in glory.  

2020 is almost done.  Despite all the evil which we’ve seen run rampant, our God and King is still firmly upon His Throne.  We need to celebrate that critical and eternal fact!  You might want to consider ending the year with an extra prayer (if not several).  Might I recommend to you the Te Deum?

The Te Deum, also sometimes called the Ambrosian Hymn because if its association with St. Ambrose, is a traditional hymn of joy and thanksgiving. First attributed to Sts. Ambrose, Augustine, or Hilary, it is now accredited to Nicetas, Bishop of Remesiana (4th century). It is used at the conclusion of the Office of the Readings for the Liturgy of the Hours on Sundays outside Lent, daily during the Octaves of Christmas and Easter, and on Solemnities and Feast Days. The petitions at the end were added at a later time and are optional. A partial indulgence is granted to the faithful who recite it in thanksgiving and a plenary indulgence is granted if the hymn is recited publicly on the last day of the year. (CatholicCulture.org)

Below you’ll find the prayer, along with videos offering chanted forms of the prayer in both English and Latin.

Prayer:

O God, we praise Thee, and acknowledge Thee to be the supreme Lord.

Everlasting Father, all the earth worships Thee.

All the Angels, the heavens and all angelic powers,

All the Cherubim and Seraphim, continuously cry to Thee:

Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Hosts!

Heaven and earth are full of the Majesty of Thy glory.

The glorious choir of the Apostles,

The wonderful company of Prophets,

The white-robed army of Martyrs, praise Thee.

Holy Church throughout the world acknowledges Thee:

The Father of infinite Majesty;

Thy adorable, true and only Son;

Also the Holy Spirit, the Comforter.

O Christ, Thou art the King of glory!

Thou art the everlasting Son of the Father.

When Thou tookest it upon Thyself to deliver man,

Thou didst not disdain the Virgin’s womb.

Having overcome the sting of death, Thou opened the Kingdom of Heaven to all believers.

Thou sittest at the right hand of God in the glory of the Father.

We believe that Thou willst come to be our Judge.

We, therefore, beg Thee to help Thy servants whom Thou hast redeemed with Thy Precious Blood.

Let them be numbered with Thy Saints in everlasting glory.

V. Save Thy people, O Lord, and bless Thy inheritance!

R. Govern them, and raise them up forever.

V. Every day we thank Thee.

R. And we praise Thy Name forever, yes, forever and ever.

V. O Lord, deign to keep us from sin this day.

R. Have mercy on us, O Lord, have mercy on us.

V. Let Thy mercy, O Lord, be upon us, for we have hoped in Thee.

R. O Lord, in Thee I have hoped; let me never be put to shame.

Prayer Source: Thesaurus Precum Latinarum

Christmas – Abp. Fulton Sheen

Editor’s Note:  Yeah, it’s been a weird year. May God be praised that it is almost over!  We now approach an equally uncertain 2021, but between now and then, we celebrate God’s greatest intervention in human history!  He has intervened many times throughout history to save His people.  May He intervene once more in the affairs of man, and once more we pray that—at this season of Hope and Redemption—that the Divine Assistance may always be with us!  From all of us here at CatholicCyber-Militia.com (that’s me, and occasionally one other guy), may you and your family receive abundant blessings this Christmas!

Blessed Fulton Sheen, pray for us!  Here are some of his thoughts on this most holy of nights, taken from his book Life of Christ:

[E]very other person who ever came into this world came into it to live. He came into it to die. Death was a stumbling block to Socrates — it interrupted his teaching. But to Christ, death was the goal and fulfillment of His life, the gold that He was seeking. Few of His words or actions are intelligible without reference to His Cross. He presented Himself as a Savior rather than merely as a Teacher. It meant nothing to teach men to be goo unless He also gave them the power to be good, after rescuing them from the frustration of guilt.

The story of every human life begins with birth and ends with death. In the Person of Christ, however, it was His death that was first and His life that was last. … 

The manger and the Cross thus stand at the two extremities of the Savior’s life! He accepted the manger because there was no room in the inn; He accepted the Cross because men said, “We will not have this man for our king.” Disowned upon entering, rejected upon leaving, He was laid in a stranger’s stable at the beginning, and a stranger’s grave at the end. An ox and an ass surrounded His crib at Bethlehem; two thieves were to flank His Cross on Calvary. He was wrapped in swaddling bands in His birthplace, He was again laid in swaddling clothes in His tomb — clothes symbolic of the limitations imposed on His Divinity when He took a human form. …He was already bearing His Cross — the only cross a Babe could bear, a cross of poverty, exile and limitation. His sacrificial intent already shone forth in the message the angels sang to the hills of Bethlehem:

     This day, in the city of David

A Savior has been born for you,

The Lord Christ Himself. (Luke 2:11)

Vatican Nativity Scene: Aliens, Again?

More evidence that aliens are interfering in the Vatican. Just look at the 2020 Nativity Scene!*

This special edition of The H-Files delves into the mystery behind the bizarre display the Vatican put up a few days ago. The creatures it depicts do not look human…

*No, this isn’t the actual opinion of CCM; it’s just a fun video. We actually subscribe to the “Three M’s” as the explanation for how weird (and disturbing) our clerical leadership has become.

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