Category Archives: That Amazin’ Amazon Synod!

Devotional Catholicism is no longer enough. Just ask Mr. Dogma.

The Amazon Synod is proof positive that your Catholic faith is under attack.  During the course of this meeting of selected Church leadership–augmented by a powerful assortment of non-Catholic secularists, Marxists, globalists, and a couple of shamans thrown in for good measure–we treated to spectacle after spectacle.  Pagan dances around carved wooden images of an Earth goddess, canoe parades of that same goddess inside our most revered churches, nonsensical lay “Amazon workshops” taking place inside St. Maria in Transpontina, the participants arrayed in a circle with their backs to the Tabernacle, Franciscans in full habit bowing down before above-mentioned idols…the list seems nearly endless.

If the Synod were only about cheezy displays of low-rent paganism, it would be abomination enough.  But the real damage which the Amazon Synod is poised to inflict upon us all isn’t limited to just that.  Now that the participants have overwhelmingly passed proposals for married priests and female deacons, they will skulk off to dark corners and prepare a document for Pope Francis to sign which will–as some Modernist German prelate boasted–change the Church for ever.

How will you endure in the face of the growing crisis? Get yourself some dogma! Hank Igitur and Mr. Dogma himself have some recommendations for you…

 

What the..? Can ANYONE explain this to me with a positive spin?!

Can ANYONE explain this to me?  On the eve of the Amazon Synod, this happens…
———————
Pope Francis received James Martin, S.J., in a 30-minute private audience in the papal library of the Vatican’s Apostolic Palace this morning, Sept. 30, in what is seen here as a highly significant public statement of support and encouragement for this U.S. Jesuit.

Father Martin is well known as a public speaker, author and for his pastoral
ministry to L.G.B.T. people.

Full Article can be found in the magazine America published by (of course) the Jesuits. Seriously, readers: somebody explain to me how this is a good thing for our Catholic Faith?

Cardinal Sarah on Priestly Celibacy

Since the issue of priestly celibacy is going to be one of the “hot button” topics addressed at the upcoming Synod on the Amazon, it might be informative to hear what a prominent African prelate has to say on the matter.

Robert Cardinal Sarah

What Cardinal Sarah has to say on the topic of priestly celibacy is certainly worth hearing…but will he be heard at the Amazon Synod?

Here are some excerpts from address given by Robert Cardinal Sarah at Église Saint  François-Xavier in Paris, May 25, 2019, just hours after he visited the Cathedral of Notre-Dame of Paris following the catastrophic fire which nearly destroyed it. The link to the entire article can be found at the bottom.

I often hear it said that priestly celibacy is only a question of historical discipline. I firmly believe that this is false. As we said above, celibacy reveals the very essence of Christian priesthood, namely the perfect configuration and total identification of the priest with Christ, High Priest of the New Covenant and of the good things to come (Heb 9:11). In this sense, the priest is not only an alter Christus, another Christ, he is truly ipse Christus, Christ himself. By the Eucharistic consecration, he is totally configured to Christ, he is so to speak “transubstantiated,” transformed, changed into Christ. And because Christ and the Apostles lived in perfect chastity and celibacy as a sign of their total and absolute gift to the Father, it is thus fundamental today as well to see celibacy as a vital necessity for the Church. To speak of it as a secondary reality is hurtful to all the priests of the world!

I am deeply persuaded that the relativization of the law of priestly celibacy will reduce the priesthood to a simple function. But priesthood is not a function but a state. To be a priest is not first and foremost to do something, but to be something. It is to be Christ; it is to be the extension of the presence of Christ among men. Christ is truly the Church’s spouse. He loved the Church and gave himself up for her “in order to make her holy by cleansing her with the washing of water by the word, so as to present the church to himself in splendor, without a spot or wrinkle or anything of the kind—yes, so that she may be holy and without blemish” (Ep 5:25-27). The priest for his part gives himself as Christ was given for the whole Church. Celibacy manifests this gift, and is its concrete and vital sign. Celibacy is the seal of the Cross on our priestly life! It is the cry of the  priestly soul proclaiming its love for the Father and its total gift of self to the Church!

The desire to relativize celibacy leads to scorning this radical gift that so many faithful priests have lived since the day of their ordination. I want to shout with so many of my fellow priests my profound suffering in the face of this scorn for priestly celibacy! Of course, there can be weakness in this domain. But he who falls rises immediately and pursues his way following Christ with more fidelity and determination.

Read the entire article here–> https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2019/06/21/cardinal-sarah-we-must-rebuild-the-cathedral-we-do-not-need-to-invent-a-new-church/

 

Blowgun Blowback on the Amazon Synod

In an earlier video, CCM contributor Hank Igitur offered a startlingly effective solution to the priest shortage in the Amazon Basin.  If the hierarchy adopted his revolutionary idea,** there might not even be a need to have the Amazon Synod in the first place!

Well, as you might imagine, there has been considerable feedback on this radical idea.  In this latest video, Hank recaps some of the more interesting comments he’s received!

**The radical idea:  send missionaries.  I know!  Crazy, right?

 

That Amazin’ Amazon Synod!

Yep.  “Amazin'” is the only way to describe the plans afoot for the much-ballyhooed and disturbingly controversial Sinodo para a Amazonia.  Amazonia is a general term for the area encompassing the Amazon basin, which stretches over eight nations covering roughly a third of South America.  The Amazon Synod, planned for October 2019, is an ambitious attempt to address a wide variety of ecological, political, economic, and even religious challenges confronting the inhabitants of that critical–yet troubled–region of our planet.

The working document (Instrumentum Laboris in Latin) for the synod came out a few weeks ago, and it created quite a stir in what Catholic World Report describes as “certainly of the kitchen sink variety. It has all the bullet points: everything anyone could want, and more.”

The document is long. Translated from the Portuguese original, the Spanish version of The Amazon: New Paths for the Church and Integral Ecology comes in at twenty-two thousand words, give or take, footnotes included. It is articulated in three parts: of four, nine, and eight chapters, respectively, over one hundred forty-nine numbered paragraphs. The major divisions are: “The voice of Amazonia”; “Integral Ecology: The Cry of the Earth and of the Poor”; “A Prophetic Church in Amazonia: Challenges and Hopes.”

There is absolutely no doubt that Amazonia–both the region itself and more particularly its indigenous peoples–have been shamelessly and brutally exploited over the centuries.  That the Church should address such injustices seems to us here at CCM to be entirely proper.  But the working document frequently goes off in odd directions.  (So odd, in fact, that Walter Cardinal Brandmüller calls the working document for the Synod “heretical” and an “apostasy” from Divine Revelation.  

As William Kilpatrick says in an essay for Crisis Magazine:

The most ironic thing about this new venture into the primitive is that some of the prime movers are the leaders of the Catholic Church. Take the upcoming Amazon Synod. The working document for the Synod does makes some valid observations about the biological and climatological importance of the Amazonian region and about the exploitation of the Amazonian people. But when it comes to describing the peoples, the “Voice of the Amazon” sounds suspiciously like the voice of Rousseau—or better, the voice of Rousseau harmonized with the voice of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, and elevated to the cosmic level.  Thus:

  • A fundamental aspect of the root of human sin is to detach oneself from nature… (99)
  • A cosmic dimension of experience (cosmovivencia) palpitates within the families. (75)
  • It is necessary to grasp what the Spirit of the Lord has taught these people throughout the centuries: faith in the God Father-Mother Creator; communion and harmony with the earth; solidarity with one’s companions … the living relationship with nature and “Mother Earth.” (121)

It’s a sort of 21st Century New Agey re-imagining of Rosseau’s “Noble Savage” construct.  Dwelling overlong on that romantic notion of indigenous peoples tempts one to see them as the teachers, the guardians of profound divine truths that Western civilization desperately needs to learn.  The idea that Catholicism is the legitimate guardian of the divine truths which lead people to eternal salvation has to take a bit of a back seat…at the very least it should zip its lip and listen attentively to “the ancient wisdom of the ancestors.

Another problem the synod will address is that of the priest shortage in Amazonia.  The most practical solution, according to many associated with synod preparation, is to ordain indigenous married elders, presumably using some sort of “fast track” seminary process.  Because these potential priests have wives (who themselves, one must allow, equally well-versed in the wisdom of their culture), these wives could be given some sort of official role in parish life as well…perhaps even as a sort of deaconess or something.

Something for everyone in the Instrumentum Laboris, to be sure!

Here at CCM, we’ll be watching developments closely.  I expect we’ll even have a dedicated section on our home page where our vast readership (all three dozen of you!) can easily keep abreast of each amazin’ twist and turn on the road to the Amazon Synod.